Documenting the Co-Ed Killer case

Category: David Jouvent (Page 1 of 2)

“A man would be a fool to marry a woman smarter than himself”

To one of his drinking companions, Ed Kemper confided that he’d become engaged and he commented that a ‘man would be a fool to marry a woman smarter than himself.’ Kemper did not marry the girl. In fact, she was seldom seen in the area and little was known of her except that she came from a Central Valley town, was small, blonde, young and immature. Later, he told an investigator that he worshipped her in an ‘almost religious’ way and that they had never engaged in a sexual relationship.

In fact, he claimed that he had had normal sexual intercourse only once and this with a woman who rejected him when he approached her a second time. But he also said on other occasions that he had never had normal relations with a woman; and again, that he had frequently attempted intercourse with a woman but had never reached a climax.

Source: The Coed-Killer by Margaret Cheney, p. 38-39 / Image: textless frame from David Jouvent’s upcoming graphic novel about Kemper

New images and release date for Kemper graphic novel

These new images were released a few days ago on Facebook by cartoonist David Jouvent.

The release date has been pushed back due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It will come out in France on August 26, 2020. Published in French by Éditions Robinson (Hachette), the book is 48 pages long.

Ed Kemper, 6’9″, 280 pounds, is an American serial killer nicknamed “the Ogre of Santa Cruz”. Cannibal and necrophile, he was convicted for 8 murders including that of his own mother. It was with him that the term serial killer and profiling methods were used for the first time.

Scriptwriter Thomas Mosdi (author of Les Succubes) and cartoonist David Jouvent (Les dragons de la cité rouge) retrace the journey of the serial killer who inspired the character of Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs, in a comic book both exciting and terrifying.

A good horror story

In April 1973, following Kemper’s arrest, early on in his taped confession to police, Sergeant Aluffi asked Kemper to hold up because the tape had gotten “all messed up” in the recorder. Kemper then commented, “Oh, Jeez, wouldn’t this make a good horror story on tape?”

Source: The Co-Ed Killer, Margaret Cheney, 1976 / Drawing by David Jouvent from his upcoming graphic novel about Ed Kemper

Kemper’s friendship with police

Drawing from David Jouvent for his upcoming graphic novel about Ed Kemper

“My relations with the police were much exaggerated at the time of my crimes. I knew two or three agents. The bar I went to wasn’t in front of the police station, it was more than sixteen hundred feet away, in front of the courthouse. The Jury Room, Joe Mandela’s Jury Room. ‘Come in and give us your verdict’, that’s the slogan under the sign. The establishment is rather quiet and a number of police officers frequent it. At the time I was committing my crimes, I used the friendship bonds that I’d woven with these policemen to learn more about the progress of the investigation.

Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, I had read it when I was younger. “(Kemper smiles.) With this criminal who feels the pressure building up inside: Are they following me? And he ends up cracking and confessing. This is a novel. I want to avoid all of that. I had no problem getting information out of these officers. Why? Because of the very structure of the police hierarchy, whose elite is represented by the criminal brigade. They see themselves as the cream of the crop and they like to brag about their exploits in front of other cops. So, there is a certain jealousy and friction between the different services.

As for me, I was doing a little dragging around these simple cops. I didn’t care about being their friend. I had already been in prison. I didn’t like the police. But they were talking to each other about what they’d heard about the case. I was on the periphery. They snubbed me, as they were snubbed by the ‘supercops’ of the Criminal. But I wasn’t bothered by their presence, I didn’t act weirdly in front of them and that’s something they must have felt.

Usually, any citizen who speaks to a police officer in uniform is clumsy, as if he’s guilty of something, even if he’s clean. And I think cops are sensitive to that kind of thing; as soon as they put on a uniform, they know right away that they’re no longer like the others. Relationships are skewed. It’s something that must hurt them somehow. But if I don’t act that way, if I don’t treat them like an insect under the microscope, then I’ve slipped a foot in the crack of the door. Little by little, you learn to pay for beers and get to know each other: ‘How’s it going, Big Ed’, ‘Great, and you, Andy, etc. And a year later, I phone them to tell them, ‘I’m the Co-Ed Killer. I want to surrender. ‘

Source: L’Ogre de Santa Cruz (Stéphane Bourgoin, 1998, Éditions Méréal)

The Devil’s Slide

“I wanted to distract the heat from Santa Cruz… I knew the Bay Area well, because the job that I do entails intensive travel through those areas. Especially like with the disposal of Alice’s head and hands, I knew that this was an ideal place because the authorities would figure it was somebody that knew that particular area really well, and I knew that people at two o’clock in the morning would not be traveling the road at all. So they would think it would be at least somebody within five or ten miles of that area, and that’s what I wanted people to think. I arrived on the scene up in Eden Canyon Road about two A.M.”

Ed Kemper about disposing of alice liu’s remains

Ed Kemper drove to an area known as Devil’s Slide. He drove into Pacifica to see if cops were around-they were at a local diner-so he drove back to the cliff and threw the body parts off. 

The horror was underscored two weeks later, when a hiker near Devil’s Slide found the skulls of two young women. Tests showed they were Rosalind Thorpe and Alice Liu’s heads. 

Devil’s Slide is a name given to a steep, rocky coastal promontory located about midway between Montara and the Linda Mar District of Pacifica. The terrain is characterized by steep, eroded slopes with natural gradients ranging between 30 and 50%.  http://www.devilsslidecoast.org/history/

Drawings by David Jouvent for his upcoming graphic novel about Ed Kemper / Some photos by Christopher Michel 

Ed Kemper’s arrest on April 24, 1973 in Pueblo, Colorado

Officer Conner spoke up on the extension, “All right. Just tell me where you are and we’ll have someone come and pick you up.”

“Yeah,” said Kemper. “That’s what I want.”

At Officer Conner’s suggestion, he left the telephone booth, walked to the curb, and checked street signs not far from where his car was parked.

“I’ll be at Twenty-first Street and Norwood Avenue in Pueblo,” he said. “I’m driving a car I rented in Reno.”

Officer Conner spoke up. “Hey, Ed. While we’re talking to you, we’re going to have somebody come over.”

“Yeah,” said Edmund Kemper, “I wish to shit you would, really, ‘cause I have over 200 rounds of ammo in the trunk and three guns. I don’t even want to go near it.”

He (Kemper) wanted to get it all out now – the waiting was coming to an end. But suddenly he broke off. “The man’s here. Whew! He’s got a gun on me!”

“Let me talk to him,” said Officer Conner.

Excerpts from The Co-ed Killer by Margaret Cheney and drawings by David Jouvent from his upcoming graphic novel about Ed Kemper. 

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